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THIS IS ISLAM

Muslim sign


Samuel Huntington wrote, "Islam's borders are bloody and so are its innards.The fundamental problem for the West is not Islamic fundamentalism. It is Islam, a different civilisation whose people are convinced of the superiority of their culture and are obsessed with the inferiority of their power.” …

OF PORN AND PEARLS

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I have made no secret of my intense dislike of Donald Trump. How a crude, bullying, narcissistic, thrice-married, unrepentant serial adulterer became the nominee of the party who has heretofore claimed to be all about family values—you know, the party who booed conscience at their 2016 national convention—is beyond me. …

FINDING WEB HOSTING, OR, HOW TO LOSE YOUR MIND

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I have been gone much longer than expected when I said I’d be taking some time. During this absence, I have learned a few things about websites, or rather, about trying to have one:

1. Finding a web hosting“service" is a lot like shopping for a car, except you can’t look under the hood, there is no test drive, and the Corvette you paid for ends up being a Yugo under the hood.

INDEPENDENCE DAY 2014

Declaration independence

Honor, justice, and humanity, forbid us tamely to surrender that freedom which we received from our gallant ancestors,
and which our innocent posterity have a right to receive from us. ~-Thomas Jefferson

IT STILL MATTERS

ussarizona pearlharbor 1941

To the Congress of the United States

Yesterday, Dec. 7, 1941 - a date which will live in infamy - the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan.

WHAT OUR GRANDMOTHERS KNEW

good-choice-bad-choice

The story of missing (and probably dead) University of Virginia student Hannah Graham is an increasingly familiar indictment of our current fantasyland culture: Young woman goes out dressed to attract attention, attracts the wrong kind of attention, goes missing for days or weeks, then turns up in some remote area having been sexually assaulted and murdered. …

FOR THOSE WHO MOURN, AT CHRISTMAS

In 2010, I discussed the story of Longfellow’s Christmas Bells. For those of us who mourn the loss of a loved one this Christmas, it is a poignant reminder that God Himself experienced the pain of loss, so we might one day never again experience such pain.

REMEMBERING MY FATHER

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My family is gratified to see all of you here as we say farewell, for now, to my father. This is just the sort of gathering he would have liked—one of his great pleasures in life was visiting with people. …

LET US GIVE THANKS 2013

General Thanksgiving

By the PRESIDENT of the United States Of America

A PROCLAMATION

WHEREAS it is the duty of all nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey His will, to be grateful for His benefits, and humbly to implore His protection and favour; and Whereas both Houses of Congress have, by their joint committee, requested me "to recommend to the people of the United States a DAY OF PUBLICK THANKSGIVING and PRAYER, to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many and signal favors of Almighty God, especially by affording them an opportunity peaceably to establish a form of government for their safety and happiness:"

VETERANS DAY 2013

On the Wall

To my dear husband, and all who have worn a uniform and stood on a wall protecting liberty, we owe you more than we can ever repay. Thank you from the bottom of my heart. ~Shyla Lefever

THIS IS ISLAM


Muslim sign

Individual Muslims may show splendid qualities, but the influence of the religion paralyses the social development of those who follow it. No stronger retrograde force exists in the world.~ Winston Churchill

Samuel Huntington wrote, "Islam's borders are bloody and so are its innards.The fundamental problem for the West is not Islamic fundamentalism. It is Islam, a different civilisation whose people are convinced of the superiority of their culture and are obsessed with the inferiority of their power.” This recognition was recently borne out in the attack of an Islamic suicide bomber on an Ariana Grande concert. Miss Grande’s fan base is preadolescent girls, a fact most certainly known to evil filth who strapped on a backpack filled with nails and screws and blew himself up for Allah. As if on cue, normal people were treated to apologists whining about“Islamophobia” and worrying about a backlash that never follows these attacks.

What is it with these people? There is no question that virtue-signaling wins them kudos among the equally addleheaded, but it seems they are utterly incapable of focusing on anything other than their feelings, even when dozens of little girls are dead or wounded. After each terrorist attack, they mew about praying for the victims, then immediately loudly warn of thugs roving the streets looking for innocent Muslims to persecute. What will it take for these people to connect with the reality that the West has imported tens of thousands of people whose culture is completely foreign to our own, who do not recognize basic human rights, and whose prophet demands we are subjugated or killed? If their own children were murdered at the hands of Islamic terrorists, these people would whimper “not all Muslims.”

Islam apologists are quick to point out that the Muslim who plotted against children was“homegrown,” as his parents immigrated to England. Three of the four London subway attackers were also second-generation“Brits” (a misuse of the term, given that being born in Britain makes someone of Arabic descent no more British than I would be Iraqi if I were born in Baghdad). Rather than supporting the notion that the problem is not Islam, this actually demonstrates a fact that should alarm every Westerner: Muslims who grow up in Western countries seem more, not less, likely to embrace the ideas of jihad, caliphate, and destruction/subjugation of the West.

Through it all, no matter the atrocity, politicians and media are blithely unconcerned that importing those whose beliefs are completely counter to our own is at the heart of this destruction. Instead, they cry for the cameras, hold vigils, and wag their figures at anyone who has the temerity to say that perhaps there is a problem with Islam.When public figures say these terrorist attacks "won't change us," what they mean is that absolutely nothing meaningful will be done to prevent them in the future. Is there nothing that will stir us into defending the West? When terrorists attack a school in America—and they will—will our response be to dash down to the candle store for yet another meaningless gesture, all the while bleating about "Islamophobia?" Make no mistake, they do not fear us. They have no reason to. The real question—the answer of which is at the heart of our survival—is, will we ever give them reason to?


~Shyla Lefever

OF PORN AND PEARLS

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Pop culture is filth. ~John Derbyshire

I have made no secret of my intense dislike of Donald Trump. How a crude, bullying, narcissistic, thrice-married, unrepentant serial adulterer became the nominee of the party who has heretofore claimed to be all about family values—you know, the party who booed conscience at their 2016 national convention—is beyond me. I was all-in for Ted Cruz—a God-fearing man who may have seemed awkward at times but stood up for the Constitution at every turn. Cruz tolerated Trump’s dishonesty, his middle-school name-calling, his childish debating behavior, and his complete lack of knowledge about the Constitution, federal processes, economics, and basically every topic not“Donald Trump,” with equanimity. It was only when Trump smeared his wife and father that Cruz had finally had enough. That Trump’s followers were, by the time of the convention, so cult-like that they failed to recognize the inherent decency and honor of Cruz says infinitely more about them than the man they booed.

Nevertheless. This recent kerfuffle involving a recording of Trump’s crude talk about women reveals the Left’s hypocrisy as little else could. For the last number of decades, rot and filth have been pushed on us as entertainment, and when anyone objected, they were ridiculed and told,“If you don’t like it, don’t look at it.” Deviancy and degeneracy were not only excused, they were celebrated and their practitioners congratulated as brave and trailblazing. And again those who raised objections were told that whatever the pathology, it was no one else’s business. Female singers strutting nearly naked on stage were powerfully owning their sexuality, and anyone who said otherwise was a hateful misogynist. The relentless pornification of America means that everywhere you turn, pop culture is screaming,“Sex! Sex! Sex!” and anyone who dares say that perhaps sex is a private matter best practiced in loving, committed relationships is just a pathetic uptight prude who ought to get with the times.

Suddenly those who push this filth are clutching their pearls in horror that Donald Trump said some disgusting words reflecting a disgusting attitude that is a perfect reflection of the crudity and baseness they have demanded we applaud. Their favorite political couple consists of a serial groper/rapist who took advantage of an idiotic young intern while in the Oval Office and his enabling wife who trashed the reputations of any woman who dared speak out against him because of her thirst for power. Their enablers were a slavering media who didn’t really care what the truth was, only about protecting their ideological comrades. None of these people have ever really paid any kind of price for their immoral and/or illegal behavior, which seems to make them believe they are now in a position to haul out the fainting couches over what a bloviating braggart said a decade ago. It is indeed unlikely that Trump has changed in the ensuing years, which actually makes their outrage even more absurd—Donald Trump has been in the public eye for nearly 40 years, and they’re just now figuring out who he is? The media is clearly doing fabulously at their job.

So once again we are faced with the glaring hypocrisy of the Left. Once again we suffer through their selective outrage designed to push their candidate knowing full well she is a dishonest,power-hungrycriminal, because nothing can stand in the way of their quest to destroy any vestiges traditional America. Hillary Clinton is almost the only person who could compel many of us to vote for Trump—we have always known who he is, we fought to avoid him as the nominee, and we have agonized about what to do in November. The pearl-clutching hypocrites on the Left may actually make it easier, despite our serious misgivings, to hold our noses and vote for the vulgarian over that awful, grasping woman.

~Shyla Lefever

FINDING WEB HOSTING, OR, HOW TO LOSE YOUR MIND

whiteflag

Computers make me totally blank out.~Dalai Lama


I have been gone much longer than expected when I said I’d be taking some time. During this absence, I have learned a few things about websites, or rather, about trying to have one:

1. Finding a web hosting“service" is a lot like shopping for a car, except you can’t look under the hood, there is no test drive, and the Corvette you paid for ends up being a Yugo under the hood.

2.If you are not an expert in software, programming, or geekspeak, you’d better buckle up—this is not going to be easy. If you are an expert on any of these, it will still not be easy.

3. If you change companies, something will go wrong. If you change companies twice, something will go wrong 20 times.

4.“24/7/365 Support” means you will get a response someday, and it will most likely be, “Good luck.

5. If you have a problem for two years, it is your problem, and yours alone, for two years, regardless of how many times you contact them, what they have told you they would do, or how often you point out that this is different from what the last guy said.

If you have a hosting service that is mostly good, for the love of all that is holy, try to stay with it. If it goes downhill—the reason I was shopping for a new service in the first place—stock up on alcohol.

~Shyla Lefever

INDEPENDENCE DAY 2014

Declaration independence

Honor, justice, and humanity, forbid us tamely to surrender that freedom which we received from our gallant ancestors,
and which our innocent posterity have a right to receive from us. ~-Thomas Jefferson


IT STILL MATTERS

ussarizona pearlharbor 1941

Pearl Harbor - December 7, 1941

To the Congress of the United States

Yesterday, Dec. 7, 1941 - a date which will live in infamy - the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan.

The United States was at peace with that nation and, at the solicitation of Japan, was still in conversation with the government and its emperor looking toward the maintenance of peace in the Pacific.

Indeed, one hour after Japanese air squadrons had commenced bombing in Oahu, the Japanese ambassador to the United States and his colleagues delivered to the Secretary of State a formal reply to a recent American message. While this reply stated that it seemed useless to continue the existing diplomatic negotiations, it contained no threat or hint of war or armed attack.

It will be recorded that the distance of Hawaii from Japan makes it obvious that the attack was deliberately planned many days or even weeks ago. During the intervening time, the Japanese government has deliberately sought to deceive the United States by false statements and expressions of hope for continued peace.

The attack yesterday on the Hawaiian islands has caused severe damage to American naval and military forces. Very many American lives have been lost. In addition, American ships have been reported torpedoed on the high seas between San Francisco and Honolulu.

Yesterday, the Japanese government also launched an attack against Malaya.

Last night, Japanese forces attacked Hong Kong.

Last night, Japanese forces attacked Guam.

Last night, Japanese forces attacked the Philippine Islands.

Last night, the Japanese attacked Wake Island.

This morning, the Japanese attacked Midway Island.

Japan has, therefore, undertaken a surprise offensive extending throughout the Pacific area. The facts of yesterday speak for themselves. The people of the United States have already formed their opinions and well understand the implications to the very life and safety of our nation.

As commander in chief of the Army and Navy, I have directed that all measures be taken for our defense.

Always will we remember the character of the onslaught against us.

No matter how long it may take us to overcome this premeditated invasion, the American people in their righteous might will win through to absolute victory.

I believe I interpret the will of the Congress and of the people when I assert that we will not only defend ourselves to the uttermost, but will make very certain that this form of treachery shall never endanger us again.

Hostilities exist. There is no blinking at the fact that our people, our territory and our interests are in grave danger.

With confidence in our armed forces - with the unbounding determination of our people - we will gain the inevitable triumph - so help us God.

I ask that the Congress declare that since the unprovoked and dastardly attack by Japan on Sunday, Dec. 7, a state of war has existed between the United States and the Japanese empire.

WHAT OUR GRANDMOTHERS KNEW

good-choice-bad-choice

One's philosophy is not best expressed in words; it is expressed in the choices one makes... and the choices we make are ultimately our responsibility.~Eleanor Roosevelt


The story of missing (and probably dead) University of Virginia student Hannah Graham is an increasingly familiar indictment of our current fantasyland culture: Young woman goes out dressed to attract attention, attracts the wrong kind of attention, goes missing for days or weeks, then turns up in some remote area having been sexually assaulted and murdered. Heartbroken families are left to grieve and hope for some sort of justice. The rest of society expresses outrage at the loss of a promising life, yet refuses to talk about anything that might genuinely prevent such horrors in the future.

At what point are we going to start telling ourselves, and consequently our young, what was common sense in every age before 1960? All choices have consequences, and it doesn’t matter if they’re not “fair” or what someone “should” be able to do. We do not live in a world in which everything is fair or should’s have any relevance whatsoever.Until the Great Divorce from Reality,“Nature, red in tooth and claw” was clearly understood to apply to every facet of life. Now, feminists howl that a woman should be able to march naked anywhere she chooses without a man noticing (in feminism’s ongoing effort to emasculate men, the rule is men are only allowed to notice women when those women want to be noticed). Is it any surprise that a young woman thinks that wearing half a shirt and drinking until she can’t walk is acceptable behavior and that nothing bad will happen to her because of some notion of should?

If a man walked down a city street at midnight with $100 bills pinned all over his suit, would anyone be surprised if he were mugged? Not only would the first question be, “What on earth did he think was going to happen?!” but plenty would say he asked for it, that this is what happens when you behave in ways that predictably attract those who are unbound by decency and respect for the law (prisons exist because amidst all the denial and excuse-making, there is a vague recognition that not everyone behaves as he should). Yet when a woman behaves as though the world is safe and cozy and well-intentioned, well, she should be able to do anything she wants and we should just teach men not to be rapists and murderers (according to every brain-dead female on Twitter). Why do we have such a lower standard for women to understand basic rationality?

Did Hannah Graham, Morgan Harrington, and similar young women deserve their fates? Does it really matter? They met them, and others will meet identical fates if we don’t grow up and face the world as it is, not as we wish it were. This is a culture of children crying “It’s not fair!” and thinking that somehow matters. The simple fact is, some choices put a person at greater risk than others, and if a simple statement of that fact is “blaming the victim,” then we need to do a whole lot more victim-blaming in hopes of avoiding more victim-creating.

Good people can make bad choices, but no one can really claim to be a good parent or a good friend if they are unwilling to confront those choices that are so obviously foolish, risky, and lacking in self-respect. Such misguided loyalty contributes to tragedy. So listen up, girls: The world can be a very dangerous place, and it doesn’t bend to conform to your ideas about what it should be. Grow up, wise up, and cover up. Determine that you will not put yourselves into situations that lead to your diminishment and possible demise. Self-respect means you make great demands of yourself, and that you are willing to behave differently from those who are asking less of themselves, even if they are your friends. Do not look to other people to take care of you—that’s your job. Do it as though your life depends on it.

~Shyla Lefever


FOR THOSE WHO MOURN, AT CHRISTMAS

For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord. ~Luke 2:11

In 2010, I discussed the story of Longfellow’s Christmas Bells. For those of us who mourn the loss of a loved one this Christmas, it is a poignant reminder that God Himself experienced the pain of loss, so we might one day never again experience such pain.

Devastated by the death of his beloved wife Fanny in a fire in 1861, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow feared he would go insane, claiming he was “inwardly bleeding to death.” The first Christmas after Fanny's death, Longfellow wrote, “How inexpressibly sad are all holidays.” Two years after losing Fanny, Longfellow suffered at the news that his son Charles had been seriously wounded as a lieutenant in the Army of the Potomac. Longfellow’s journal was silent on the Christmas of 1863. Finally, on Christmas Day of 1864, he wrote the words of the poem Christmas Bells. Originally seven stanzas long, the poem was set to music and, typically shortened to four verses, is the well-known Christmas carol I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day.

I heard the bells on Christmas day
Their old familiar carols play
And mild and sweet the words repeat,
Of peace on earth, good will to men.

I thought how as the day had come,
The belfries of all Christendom
Had roll’d along th’ unbroken song
Of peace on earth, good will to men.

And in despair I bow’d my head:
“There is no peace on earth,” I said,
“For hate is strong, and mocks the song
Of peace on earth, good will to men.”

Then pealed the bells more loud and deep:
“God is not dead, nor doth He sleep;
The wrong shall fail, the right prevail,
With peace on earth, good will to men.”


~Shyla Lefever

REMEMBERING MY FATHER

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Herbert Clyde Welch 1928-2013

A man of knowledge uses words with restraint, and a man of understanding is even-tempered. ~Proverbs 17:27

My family is gratified to see all of you here as we say farewell, for now, to my father. This is just the sort of gathering he would have liked—one of his great pleasures in life was visiting with people. He really was a family man, which is a good thing when you think about just how big this family is.

It’s a bit difficult to know what to say about my father. Each of us has our own memories of him. Nothing I can say about him can do him justice, and I am grateful that you all knew him so you are not counting on me to give a full picture of who he was. What I share today will probably not be news to anyone who knew him—they are simply some of the myriad thoughts I have when I think about my dad.

My father grew up in humble circumstances, and I think he was particularly determined that his children would not feel poor, as he had. I didn’t realize until recently, when he reminisced with me, how difficult some aspects of his childhood were. He liked his job at the roller rink because in between helping people put on their skates, he could skate himself—he said he particularly liked skating backwards, which I would really like to have seen. But because they were poor and he was youngest, he sometimes had to stay behind while all the other kids went to the swimming hole, or rode their horses, and as he talked about it, he said, “I think I kind of missed out.” That was my dad—he accepted things with good grace, but they made a lasting impression and he didn’t want us to miss out. If something was important to us, we had the idea that it would matter to him, too. Kids being what they are, suddenly everything gained in importance, but there was something very nice about knowing that our dad cared about our feelings.

My father had a bit of a chance to see the world when he was in the Navy—he loved the ocean, and the stars—but he always wanted to return to his beloved Montana. This was also true when he became a federal investigator. He was excellent at his job, and dedicated to it, but when he first started, his boss told him—while he was having dinner at our house, no less—that my dad probably didn’t have what it took to be an investigator and he didn't see much of a future for him. But as people learned, it was hard not to talk to my dad, and a decade later he was named “Investigator of the Year” by the federal government. Even though it's no secret that I think the federal government is about as incompetent as they can possibly be, they got that one right. I don’t think people underestimated my dad often, but that boss certainly didn’t understand the man before his eyes.

My father had the most remarkable self-discipline—something I admired even as I haven’t ever quite managed to emulate it. He flew out to see me one year when I lived in Washington, DC—Thanksgiving Day, just him and a planeful of Japanese tourists—and we decided to drive to Newport, Rhode Island to see where he'd gone to Officer Candidate School. I tend to be an early riser, especially when I’m traveling, and I also tend to get nervous about the time. My dad agreed that we should get an early start. So I was up, packed, and ready to go by 6 a.m. My dad was also up early—he showered, shaved, did his back exercises, went to breakfast, and we got out of our hotel by the crack of nine.

I think of my father as a vigorous man. He’d been a football player, and later a coach, and he excelled at both, but he had a particular love of baseball and especially enjoyed the World Series. He really hung in there for his Boston Red Sox. Dave and Ken were right alongside him in their love of sports, but his daughter, perhaps to his chagrin, cared nothing for sports and wasn’t even aware of what season it was. One evening I called and chatted on about this and that, and got almost no response from him. I was sure it must be his hearing, so I spoke louder. Nothing. I spoke even louder. Still nothing. Finally, I said, “Daddy? Are you there?” and he said, “The World Series is on.” And that is how I learned not to call in the evening in October.

I am grateful that my father was a man of his time—it meant that we had a wonderful father, not someone trying to be a best friend. He was thoroughly honorable, decent, trustworthy, and kind. We knew what he expected of us, and even though he was pretty soft-hearted when it came to discipline—which was maddening to my mother when she was left holding the bag—there were some lines you just didn’t cross with him. He didn’t want to hear sass, and he wouldn’t tolerate a lie. He was the kind of person you wanted to please, and grow to be like. I know I’ve fallen short, but I also know that he was proud of each of us, including me despite my various stumbles. And to his grandchildren, I know how much you loved him, and there has never been a prouder grandparent—he could not possibly have loved you more. I hope you will commit to doing your Christian duty without fail, as your grandfather did.In that way, you will carry his legacy.

I would be remiss if I did not discuss my mother, because she was a wonderful wife to my dad for more than 50 years. She made the moves across the country, she endured the time apart, she raised us while he wasn’t home and made sure that he could enjoy the time with us when he was. She was a loving, dedicated wife. My father was a quiet man not given to effusive expression, but more than once he quietly said what a remarkable woman she is. I am grateful for the example of abiding love and commitment they set for us.

Once people mattered to my father, they mattered to him for good. He would talk fondly about people he hadn’t seen in years, and was never happier than when he got to sit and visit. He deeply loved his nieces and nephews, and thoroughly enjoyed listening as they talked, even when he got to the point where he couldn’t hear everything. The point to him was the relationship. At the end of his life, my father—the family man—lived some of the time in another world where the people he had known and loved years before were alive and well. He would ask about his dad, talk to his mother and his brothers, and it seems strangely lovely and appropriate that he died 52 years to the day after his beloved mother died.

Our lives are a result of the choices we make. My father chose to be a good son, a good father, a good friend, and a good man. I have noticed the common thread in what people have said, in what we are all experiencing, is we each want one more: One more chance to see him, to talk with him, to be in his presence. To have loved such a man and had him as long as we did is a tremendous blessing. The loss is great because the love was great.

I will close with a verse attributed to Henry Van Dyke:

I am standing upon that foreshore.

A ship at my side spreads her white sails to the morning breeze and starts for the blue ocean. She is an object of beauty and strength and I stand and watch her until at length she hangs like a speck of white clouds just where the sea and sky come down to mingle with each other.

Then someone at my side says, “There! She's gone!”

“Gone where?”

Gone from my sight, that's all. She is just as large in mast and spar and hull as ever she was when she left my side; just as able to bear her load of living freight to the place of her destination. Her diminished size is in me, not in her.

And just at that moment when someone at my side says, “There! She's gone!” there are other eyes watching her coming and other voices ready to take up the glad shout,“Here she comes!” And that is dying.


Enjoy the glad shouts, Daddy.

Shyla Lefever

21 December 2013

LET US GIVE THANKS 2013

For each new morning with its light,
For rest and shelter of the night,
For health and food, for love and friends,
For everything Thy goodness sends.
~Ralph Waldo Emerson

General Thanksgiving

By the PRESIDENT of the United States Of America

A PROCLAMATION

WHEREAS it is the duty of all nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey His will, to be grateful for His benefits, and humbly to implore His protection and favour; and Whereas both Houses of Congress have, by their joint committee, requested me "to recommend to the people of the United States a DAY OF PUBLICK THANKSGIVING and PRAYER, to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many and signal favors of Almighty God, especially by affording them an opportunity peaceably to establish a form of government for their safety and happiness:"

NOW THEREFORE, I do recommend and assign THURSDAY, the TWENTY-SIXTH DAY of NOVEMBER next, to be devoted by the people of these States to the service of that great and glorious Being who is the beneficent author of all the good that was, that is, or that will be; that we may then all unite in rendering unto Him our sincere and humble thanks for His kind care and protection of the people of this country previous to their becoming a nation; for the signal and manifold mercies and the favorable interpositions of His providence in the course and conclusion of the late war; for the great degree of tranquility, union, and plenty which we have since enjoyed;-- for the peaceable and rational manner in which we have been enable to establish Constitutions of government for our safety and happiness, and particularly the national one now lately instituted;-- for the civil and religious liberty with which we are blessed, and the means we have of acquiring and diffusing useful knowledge;-- and, in general, for all the great and various favours which He has been pleased to confer upon us.

And also, that we may then unite in most humbly offering our prayers and supplications to the great Lord and Ruler of Nations and beseech Him to pardon our national and other transgressions;-- to enable us all, whether in publick or private stations, to perform our several and relative duties properly and punctually; to render our National Government a blessing to all the people by constantly being a Government of wise, just, and constitutional laws, discreetly and faithfully executed and obeyed; to protect and guide all sovereigns and nations (especially such as have shewn kindness unto us); and to bless them with good governments, peace, and concord; to promote the knowledge and practice of true religion and virtue, and the increase of science among them and us; and, generally to grant unto all mankind such a degree of temporal prosperity as he alone knows to be best.

GIVEN under my hand, at the city of New-York, the third day of October, in the year of our Lord, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine.

G. Washington


VETERANS DAY 2013

On the Wall

The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him,
but because he loves what is behind him. ~G. K. Chesterton

To my dear husband, and all who have worn a uniform and stood on a wall protecting liberty, we owe you more than we can ever repay. Thank you from the bottom of my heart. ~Shyla Lefever

St. Crispin’s Day Speech (Henry V)
by William Shakespeare

This day is called the feast of Crispian.
He that outlives this day, and comes safe home,
Will stand a tip-toe when this day is named,
And rouse him at the name of Crispian.

He that shall live this day, and see old age,
Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbours,
And say ‘To-morrow is Saint Crispin’s:’
Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars,
And say ‘These wounds I had on Crispin's day.”

Old men forget; yet all shall be forgot,
But he'll remember, with advantages,
What feats he did that day. Then shall our names,
Familiar in his mouth as household words-
Harry the King,
Bedford and Exeter,
Warwick and Talbot,
Salisbury and Gloucester,
Be in their flowing cups freshly remember’d.

This story shall the good man teach his son;
And Crispin Crispian shall ne'er go by,
From this day to the ending of the world,
But we in it shall be remembered—

We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile,
This day shall gentle his condition;

And gentlemen in England now a-bed
Shall think themselves accursed they were not here,
And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks
That fought with us upon Saint Crispin’s day.